London Guides: New (& Noteworthy) Restaurants in 2018

In today’s day and age, to be a Londoner is tantamount to being a foodie. Our lives revolve around an epicurean existence, our diaries dictated by a bucket-list of the latest and the greatest from the city’s mushrooming myriad of restaurants.

Sure, we all have our old favourites and harbour a delicious secret (or two) about London’s hidden gems… but there’s nothing quite like the thrill of eating at the most buzz-worthy opening in town too! Gathered here, is a rolling roundup of the best of these new spots. I’ll be updating the list regularly, so it’s definitely one to bookmark and return to when you’re next in need of inspiration…


Scully, St James’

Possibly the most fascinating restaurant in London at the moment, Scully in St James’ is the first solo venture of the eponymous chef, Ramael Scully, who up until recently headed Yotam Ottolenghi’s, Nopi.

Defying any singular label, his menu is inspired by the vastly-different culinary traditions of his mixed heritage (which can be traced from Bali to Ireland) and background (he was born in Malaysia and grew up in Sydney). Expect seasonal British produce transformed by Asian cooking techniques and a bewitching bevy of house-made spices and syrups… Read the full review, here

Scully, 4 St James’s Market, St James’s, SW1Y 4QA | http://www.scullyrestaurant.com

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Sabor, Heddon Street

If you fancy journeying along the vast regions of Spain, hop on over to Calle de Heddon (just off Regent Street), where the former executive chef of Barrafina, Nieves Barragan Mohacho, has just set up her first restaurant, Sabor.

There’s an asador (grill) upstairs, while the ground-floor tapas bar centres on a gleaming kitchen counter surrounded by vibrant Andalucían tiles. The informal and intimate tone – matched by the disarming affability of the staff – lends itself to a wonderfully laid-back affair, propped up by unfettered flavours suffused with all the warmth of the Spanish sun. Just don’t miss out on the rhubarb and mascarpone tartaleta for dessert – it’s a striking symphony of cream and crunch with just that right touch of sweet tartness!

35-37 Heddon St, Mayfair, London W1B 4BR | http://www.saborrestaurants.co.uk/


Evelyn’s Table, Chinatown

Cosseted below Chinatown, this eleven-seater kitchen bar from the team behind The Palomar and Barbary, adds yet another dimension to the city’s compelling counter dining culture.

The concise yet convincing menu is loosely inspired by Southern European influences. Daily-changing fish dishes are a headlining act, the stars of which are the fresh catch of the day bought at auction from Cornish suppliers in the Looe Harbour. Veggie options are relatively limited, but no less enthralling… Truffled tagliatelle with butter and parmesan, anyone?

Oh and there’s plenty to whet your whistle too – as Evelyn’s Table is part of The Blue Posts, which also boasts a cosily clandestine cocktail lounge tucked away at the top! Read the full review, here.

28 Rupert St, London W1D 6DJ | https://theblueposts.co.uk

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Delamina, Marylebone

There’s a convivial charm to this new Levantine restaurant in Marylebone, helmed by the husband and wife team behind Strut & Cluck in Shoreditch.

Vibrant veggie dishes are a vivacious draw, overloaded with textures and tahini (heaps of tahini!), not to mention a daily pita ‘balagan’ festooned with a cacophony of changing toppings…

My advice would be to plan a weekend visit, as brunch is an entirely egg-stravagant affair featuring the likes of Turkish poached eggs (served on a bed of garlic-infused yogurt) and a peppery Shakshuka that can be sopped up with pillowy pieces of pita. There’s also a “Benedict Balagan” involving charcoaled smashed avocado, mixed peppers, sumac baby spinach and poached eggs, smothered with lashings of paprika hollandaise  on toasted English muffins. Definitely a bit of a game changer, that! More on the best Israeli food in London, here.

56-58 Marylebone Ln, Marylebone, London W1U 2NX | www.delaminamarylebone.co.uk

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Titu, Mayfair

Billing itself as a gyoza bar, Titu has taken over a somewhat jinxed corner of Shepherd Market. I say jinxed, because this site has seen a number of cafés and restaurants come and go over time. Speaking from the selfish perspective of a local, I really hope that Titu breaks this revolving pattern as it’s a lovely addition to this colourful pocket of Mayfair.

With seating for just 15, the diminutive space has an intimate sense of cosiness enlivened by the unique palette percolating from the angular walls – there’s a subtle shift in the shade depending on the time of day! It’s not surprising to learn that the owner is an architect, nor that the head chef, Jeff Tyler, has pedigree – he previously worked at Roka, The Mandarin Oriental in Marrakech and Barcelona, and as the opening head chef at Novikov London, Moscow, Dubai and Sardinia.

Pan-fried until sheathed by  crisp golden brown bottom, the gyozas feature a glorious gallimaufry of fillings – from wagyu beef and chicken and foie gras, to a superlative veggie option involving asparagus and shiitake mushrooms. And with green tea pancakes and matcha lattes on offer for breakfast, it’s also quite a handy spot if you happen to be starting your day in Mayfair!

1A Shepherd St, Mayfair, London W1J 7HJ | https://www.titurestaurant.com

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Find a comprehensive list of all my reviews indexed by cuisine and location, here.

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Author: The Foodie Diaries

A food travel & lifestyle journal, chronicling my culinary and other adventures around town.

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